See my Wawo Muda photos in Journey magazine


Nice to see my photos of Wawo Muda volcanic crater lakes published in Journey magazine. Taken during my 2012 trip to Flores, my articles and more pictures can be found at http://www.anysomewhere.com/category/indonesia/flores/
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Marina Bay Sands Hotel, Singapore, Serious Luxury and an Awesome View


After living in Singapore (not at Marina Bay Sands!) for nearly one year, frequently gazing up at the majestically modern building shaped like a ship that is easily the most striking feature of the Singapore skyline, I finally got a chance to experience one of the most luxurious hotels in this metropolis, Marina Bay Sands hotel. Marina Bay Sands by night

A guest was visiting me and my husband in Singapore and I recommended her to spend one night of her trip at Marina Bay Sands. She was given a free upgrade to a suite, which was massive, with a large sitting room, meeting space, kitchen area (though no cooking facilities), two bathrooms (well, actually one bathroom and one powder room, ahem), a suitably plush bedroom, and a large balcony. The suite was not on the more expensive city-view side, but looked out over Gardens By The Bay, also a pleasant view. There was also a surprise in the suite; apparently each suite has something a bit special, its own room. My guest’s suite had its own karaoke room!

Chilling out watching one of the large flatscreen TVs, lounging on the massive soft sofa, drinking coffee made from the espresso machine, it would have been easy to spend a long time in the suite. We tried the room service, ordering dinner, and it was exquisite. But, Marina Bay Sands is certainly not all about the rooms. From outside, staring up at the top of the MBS building as I frequently did, you can see some palms trees, but not much else. In fact there is a long swimming pool running most of the way along the top, with plentiful sun-loungers, and quite simply the most spectacularly breathtaking view in Singapore. With my guest’s single booking we got swimming pool vouchers for me and my husband as well.

The view was stunning; I could have spent weeks just admiring it. And swimming while gazing at it was wonderful. But the water was freezing cold! I guess that’s the effect of being so high up in Singapore’s typically cloudy weather. Despite the low temperatures and strong winds, it was totally amazing. Known as the Skypark, as well as the long pool there are several hot jacuzzis, a chocolate bar which I didn’t try, a viewing area, and free drinking water. Towels were of course provided, and we, like many other guests, simply wore the hotel-provided dressing gowns over our swimming costumes to travel upwards in the lift. The atmosphere was of decadent relaxation, and I felt I was seeing how “the other half” live. Although it was back to reality after just one day, always a stickler for a good view, I’m pleased I had the opportunity to indulge in Singapore’s best. Pool and view

Riding the Sentosa Express Train, Singapore [Video]


Riding the Sentosa Express monorail from Imbiah station to Sentosa station at Vivocity. This is one of my favourite places in Singapore.
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A Ride in the Sentosa Tiger Sky Tower Singapore [Video]


Panoramic views of Sentosa and across to Singapore from the Tiger Sky Tower, a revolving observation tower on Sentosa island.

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Malacca Menara Taming Sari Observation Tower [Video]


The Malacca Menara Taming Sari is a revolving observation tower located in Malacca (Melaka) city, Malaysia. Sitting in the observation deck, you are taken up into the sky above the city and slowly rotated to give a panoramic view. See photos from the tower here.

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Dipabhavan Meditation Retreat, Koh Samui, Thailand


Back in 2000, when I first went travelling in Southeast Asia, I remember meeting these spaced-out people who had just finished a silent meditation retreat. At that time, the idea didn’t appeal to me at all, but as I got older and became more interested in practices such as meditation, I found I was curious about what such a retreat would entail. While travelling in Flores in 2011 I met a fellow traveller who had attended a ten-day retreat in Thailand, although she only made it through to day eight. Then curiosity got the better of me and I decided to give it a try.

Through an internet search I found the Dipabhavan Hermitage on Koh Samui island which is run by the same people as run the larger retreats at Suan Mokkh monastery on Thailand’s mainland. At Dipabhavan there is a monthly three-day retreat, running from the 7th to the 10th of the month, which seemed perfect for someone like me who had never done meditation before, let alone been silent for even a day! I booked a place, and a few weeks later found myself in a pick-up being driven to the Dipabhavan or “Development of Light” Hermitage which is up in the mountains of Samui island. As we left civilisation behind, the scenery became more and more beautiful. The tropical forest plants, massive hills and spectacular views out to sea made it worthwhile to visit this peaceful place.

Dipabhavan hermitage signWe were allowed to talk to one another at first, as we registered and deposited our valuables. We also signed up for our daily chores – I was to sweep the meditation hall every morning after breakfast. I got to know some of the other participants as we chatted over our first meal of noodles. There were thirteen of us, from a range of nationalities including Canadian, German, Dutch, British and Australian, but the hermitage could hold at least twice as many people, and I heard it gets full during peak season.

women's dormitory

The women’s dorm

We were shown to our dormitories, separate buildings for women and men. The women’s dormitory is a self-contained block with showers and toilets on the ground floor. There is only cold water and the concrete showers were very basic. The “beds” were wooden boards, with boards on three sides to offer some privacy, and a wooden pillow. Luxury it was not, but adequate and bearable for a few days.

Wooden sleeping platform

This was my bed during the retreat.

wooden pillow

And this was my wooden pillow!

Then we processed up a steep hill to the meditation hall, where a British guy called Nigel gave an introductory talk about the retreat. I have to admit I was surprised to be in Thailand doing meditation and the retreat being run by a British man – I had expected it to be run by Thai people, or even by monks. But it turned out not to matter once we got started. This introduction turned out to be our only opportunity to ask questions before the silence began. We were not to speak at all, to anyone, until the end of the silence on Monday morning.

I found the silence by far the most difficult aspect of the retreat. Never before have I been so aware of two things: firstly, most of what we say to others is insignificant and can remain unspoken without any consequence, but secondly, all those little gestures we make with insignificant words do help to keep us social, to oil the wheels of our relationships with others, not only our friends and family but the neutral people we meet in our daily lives. To not be able to speak meant to not communicate with others, but at a group retreat, we still had to sit, walk and eat together, in limited space, while not communicating. This was the weirdest aspect for me – put me alone and I’ll happily be silent, but put me close to other people and the social animal in me wants to communicate.

Meditation hall

The meditation hall

Every day we were woken at 4.30am by the bell in the meditation hall. We would quickly get up, get dressed and walk up the hill in the dark to the meditation hall. Then there would be a morning reading, teaching us something about meditation, before half an hour of meditation. Then there was yoga before breakfast. Every meditation session lasted for thirty minutes, and we learnt sitting meditation, walking meditation and loving kindness meditation. There were also sessions with damma speakers, monks based at the retreat, where we were taught some of the skills and practices of meditation. We each had a space on the floor of the meditation hall, and a cushion to sit on during sitting meditation. For walking meditation we were encouraged to find a space outside in the large grounds of the hermitage to walk in meditation.

Nature

The retreat grounds were a great place for walking meditation.

We were taught sitting meditation using breathing, where you focus on your breathing in different ways: long breathing, short breathing and normal breathing, focusing closely on the way the air hits your nose and enters your body. If any thoughts or feelings enter your mind, you are supposed to observe them without manipulating them. It was surprisingly difficult to keep this up for thirty minutes, but at least I tried. Since then I heard that thirty minutes is indeed considered long for a beginner to try to meditate.

Walking meditation was more my thing and I enjoyed and looked forward to practising it. We were taught to focus on our steps and the movements we make with our feet, using one of two rhythms: lift-go-place, or raise-lift-go-lower-place. In the natural surroundings of the hermitage it was wonderful to just be able to be there, walking slowly. On two evenings we did group walking meditation, which was a particularly powerful experience with us all processing slowly in a large circle around this Buddha statue.

BuddhaWe were also taught loving kindness meditation, where we were encouraged to imagine we were a warm afternoon sun, spreading loving kindness to a range of people, starting from oneself and ending with all people and nature. Although we couldn’t say it out loud, we were encouraged to think this verse:

                May you be happy and well,
                May your mind be peaceful and calm,
                May you be free from all suffering,
                May you be protected from all danger,
                May you be free from hatred, anger, greed and fear,
                May you find peace of mind.

The retreats at Dipabhavan are not aimed at Buddhists, but some Buddhist philosophy was imparted to us, in particular the three principles common to humans and all nature: (1) The impermanence of everything, (2) All creatures suffer, (3) The non-self, that we do not own ourselves, we belong to nature. Although I am not Buddhist, I did find it interesting to consider these points.

Every day we rose at 4.30am, did sessions of meditation, yoga, teachings, had breakfast, lunch and small afternoon snack, and slept at 9.30pm. The breakfast and lunch breaks were plenty long enough to shower and even have a rest, and I also spent time wandering around the grounds of the hermitage, enjoying nature. The food was cooked for us by the nuns who live there, and it was designed to be healthy, with plenty of vegetables. Mealtimes were the only time we spoke and only to read a short prayer giving thanks for the food. The meal was then eaten together in silence.

dining room

The dining room

So, would I go to this retreat again? I’m not sure. I enjoyed learning about meditation and Dipabhavan is the perfect place to practise it, and I have heard that if you go on a longer retreat, after the first few days, the silence is no longer burdensome. But I wished I had the opportunity to ask questions, such as about the meditation practice, and I found it difficult to be around others without communicating with them. The wooden board beds were adequate, but I couldn’t help wondering if my meditation would have been more effective after a decent sleep!

Overall, I am pleased I took the opportunity to experience a silent meditation retreat. Although I’m not rushing to attend another one, I have become more interested in meditation since then, and learnt techniques which I have practised elsewhere.

Trees

 

Is Bangkok Safe for Tourists?


I spent last week in Bangkok, a city currently wracked by massive demonstrations, with violent rioting being featured in the international media. It sounded quite dangerous and we considered cancelling our trip or visiting another area of Thailand instead. But we finally decided to press on, having already booked our flights and hotel, and spend some time in Thailand’s capital city, despite the political climate.

The Grand Palace

The Grand Palace

We intended to avoid the areas where the demonstrations were taking place, which turned out to be very easy to do. The main rally was located near the Democracy Monument, with smaller demos at government offices. We were able to visit all the major tourist attractions, including the Grand Palace, Wat Pho, Museum of Siam and MBK mall without going near the demonstrations.

Our Thai friends supported the demonstrators and assured us that even their elderly relatives were participating in the demo, so we decided to visit the main rally near the Democracy Monument. The road approaching the rally had been turned into a car park, where demonstrators had parked their cars, and little stalls where people sold demonstration items lined the street. Hairbands in the red, blue and white colours of Thailand’s national flag were popular, sold alongside yellow t-shirts, the protestors being known as “Yellow Shirts” compared to the pro-government “Red Shirts”. A pop singer was performing on the stage, and as we walked nearer it became more crowded. There was no sense of danger, however, and the atmosphere was one of positive energy and movement towards change. People I asked believed that the demonstrations would be successful in some way, at changing the current political situation in Thailand.

Sellers at the demonstration

Sellers at the demonstration

So, is Bangkok safe for tourists? Yes, definitely. It was last week anyway. If you are planning a visit to this amazing Asian city, I don’t think you need to cancel your trip. Taking heed of local information and staying up-to-date on the political situation will enable you to stay in control of whether you avoid, observe or even join the demonstrations. The demonstrations are focused on protesting against the current government and are not related to tourism, foreigners, perceived wealth or race. Therefore as a visitor, you will not be a target.Bangkok demonstrations

Tourist attractions were unaffected while I was in Bangkok, although schools and universities were closed for part of last week. And my Thai friends tell me that traffic problems are much reduced compared to normal! Potentially volatile political situations can change very quickly, however, so stay flexible, make sure you know what is happening on the ground, and you can still have a great time in Bangkok.