Hong Kong Dessert Cafes in Singapore


I’m no foodie expert, but I have found some eating places and styles that I enjoy in Singapore, and one of these is Hong Kong dessert cafes. There are a number of chains of these, including Lucky Dessert and Ji De Chi.

These cafes are often packed full with queues of people waiting outside for a sweet pudding fix. They sell a range of desserts including snow ice or shaved ice in many flavours, paste desserts, cold soy beancurd, ice cream dishes, cold cake and fruit desserts. There is something (sweet) to please everyone, and prices are reasonable, from around SGD3 to SGD7.

Sawdust Cake at Ji De Chi

Sawdust Cake at Ji De Chi (tastes much nicer than it sounds!)

Lucky Dessert is at Vivocity (and probably other malls too) and Ji De Chi has branches at Jurong Point, Dhoby Ghaut and Bugis.

Advertisements

Malacca Food: My Favourite Eats


Malacca food can be a real treat, with many cuisines available and reasonable prices. We ate some delicious food during our trip. Some of it was street food, for example at Jonker Street Night Market, and we had some tasty pork satay at a roadside stall. Here are a few places worth remembering.

Satay celup, or "dipping satay" is a Malacca speciality

Satay celup, or “dipping satay” is a Malacca speciality

1. Riverine Coffeehouse

This always seemed to be open while we were in Malacca (other places were randomly closed on some evenings). They serve up scrumptious Nyonya Cuisine, the traditional food of the Peranakan Baba Nyonya culture. We had a large pot of Ayam Masak O’, a chicken stew, with rice. One large portion was plenty for the two of us to share.

Price: We spent total MYR 28.50 including soft drinks.

Address: No 108, Lorong Hang Jebat,75200 Malacca

Nyonya Cuisine at Riverine

2. Big Bowl The City of Ice

We stumbled across this place by accident while walking back to our hotel, and it provided welcome relief from the hot weather. More than a hundred flavours of shaved ice and snow ice dishes are served at this café. The menu (shown below) offers a plethora of choices and left us wanting to come back to sample more of these sweet delights.

Address: No 23 Lorong Bukit China, Kawasan Bandar 24, 75100 Melaka

Menu at Bowl of Ice3. Famosa Chicken Rice Ball

This is the most well known of the chicken rice ball restaurants. I hadn’t been particularly excited about trying Malacca’s signature dish as friends had told me it was just like chicken rice but in balls. So I was pleasantly surprised. The rice balls tasted different to rice cooked normally, slightly saltier, with more flavour, and the chicken was delicious.

Price: Half a roasted chicken and twenty rice balls, with two orange juices, set us back MYR 29.60.

Chicken Rice Balls4. Calanthe Art Café

We came upon this colourful restaurant while looking for somewhere to have lunch. As well as serving up tasty main courses, they specialise in Malaysia 13 States’ Coffees. We ate yummy chicken curries and tried some coffee. Each state is represented by a different type of coffee and there are many choices of how to drink it.

Address: No 11 Jalan Hang Kasturi, 75200 Melaka

Calanthe Art Cafe interior

Jonker Walk Night Market, Malacca, Malaysia


If you’re in Malacca on a Friday or Saturday night, you’ll almost certainly visit Jonker Walk Night Market. Is it just another tourist market? Perhaps. But there is plenty to see, and a great atmosphere for browsing.

Jonker Walk Market

Both sides of the street, which is actually called Jalan Hang Jebat, are lined with stalls selling everything from tasty dim sum and chocolate-dipped fruit to mobile phone covers and flip-flops. Browse your way down and eat on the way back up the street, or stop at one of the cafes that puts chairs and tables outside and enjoy the a bowl of noodles or icy cendol. Despite being crowded we found it was still possible to browse comfortably, so go there at dinner time and taste some of the street food.

Jonker walk stall

Top marks for originality go to this stall!

The market is only open on Friday and Saturday nights; on other evenings it’s just a normal street, so plan your trip accordingly.

 

Eat This: Mee Goreng, Georgetown, Penang, Malaysia


Mee GorengStopping for a break from our rainy walk around Georgetown, Penang, we found ourselves at Medan Selera Lapangan Kota foodcourt, on the edge of Padang, the open “field” area right next to Fort Cornwallis.

We noticed Hameed “Pata” Special Mee was serving a lot of customers so we decided to try their mee goreng, or fried noodles. And it was delicious. Well worth it if you are hungry and nearby, and only RM4 each. We washed it down with a yummy coconut shake for RM2.50 each.

Mee Sotong stall

Batutumonga, Tana Toraja: On Top of the World


Our sturdy rental motorbike puttered its way up the steep, twisting road, carrying us up and down the steps created by broken asphalt. We were heading for Batutumonga, north of Rantepao, and not quite at the top of a mountain. We passed Torajan villages with traditional pointed roofed houses, graves in large rocks and acres of paddy fields. As we climbed further, the view became more and more spectacular.

Journey to BatutumongaBatutumonga by Bike

Batutumonga had been recommended to me by a friend as a great day out, and although the journey was tiring, it was worth it. Our rented motorbike turned out to be stronger than it looked, carrying us up steep, bumpy roads, and we were relieved we had chosen this older semi-automatic model rather than the new shiny automatic bikes that would not cope driving up these roads with two passengers.

Petrol is available at many small shops on the way up and even right at the top, which is just as well because driving in first gear up the slopes used a lot of gas. We passed many scenic points on the way up, sometimes stopping to take a photo and give our backsides a rest from the motorbike saddle.

View from BatutumongaBreathtaking Vista of Tana Toraja

At the top we were awestruck by the distance that is visible, covering pretty much the whole Toraja valley, with the town of Rantepao spread out beneath us. Paddy fields were dotted with villages and hamlets, the reddish pointed roofs of the traditional Torajan houses poking out between the trees.

The air was fresh and the breeze brisk, and there was a conveniently positioned restaurant where we had a well-deserved lunch of buffalo meat called kerbau pamarassan. We soaked up the amazing view, spotting more and more details as we sat at our table overlooking the valley.

Buffalo meat dishBack Down into the Toraja Valley

There are places to stay at Batutumonga, but we were just there for a short visit. So, after lunch and a break, we hopped back on our bike to start the journey down.

The way up had taken around two hours, with stops, but the journey down took only half this time, and we were thankful the motorcycle brakes were in good condition.

If you visit Tana Toraja, it is worth going up to Batutumonga; it’s nice to get out into the countryside for a day and the view from the top is simply breathtaking.

What I Ate in Surabaya: Soto Lamongan

Image


Soto Lamongan

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

Soto is the name for rice soup, found all over Java. Lamongan is a town not far from Surabaya and soto Lamongan is its speciality. This dish is available all over Surabaya, and I tried it at a streetside foodstall near my hotel.

 

The rice is in a turmeric yellow stock, with white noodle, chicken, egg and a squirt of lime juice. It tasted richer than the Central Javanese soto I am used to, but less curryish than the Jakartan soto I have tried. It was delicious, rich and filling but not too much so, and is well worth a try if you get the opportunity.

 

Soto Lamongan

What I Ate in Surabaya: Lontong Mie

Image


Lontong MieLontong pieces (rice cooked in a banana leaf until the individual grains become indistinguishable and it can be cut with a knife, as served with chicken satay in Solo), topped with yellow noodles, beansprouts and green leafy veg, served in a meat stock with black bean paste and chili sauce.

I tried this Surabayan dish at the Pasar Atom foodcourt. Up on the top floor of this “old style” mall, a huge variety of foods is available, including many local specialities, and it’s a good spot for people-watching.